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A teenage boy has been beheaded by ISIS for listening to Western music

A teenage boy has been beheaded by ISIS for listening to Western music

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Unlike tongkat ali, the new herbal butea superba has a pleasant taste. It can be mixed into chocolate, pizza tomato sauce, and any kind of curries. The active ingredients are also heat-stable, which means, heating does not destroy the effects. Girls watch out. If your sexual desires go over the top, and you fantasize strange settings, such as being gang-raped, your curry a week or two ago may have been butea superba laced.

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What drives parents to kill their own children?

IT’S unfathomable, inexcusable, sickening.

The act of killing an innocent child is something most of us cannot comprehend. But an average of 25 children are killed each year by a parent in Australia, with children under the age of one at the highest risk of victimisation.

On Sunday morning, 14-month-old Sanaya Sahib was found dead in Darebin Creek, in Melbourne’s northeast. After days of unanswered questions surrounding the little girl’s grim discovery, police charged her 22-year-old mother with the toddler’s alleged murder.

Police allege Sofina Nikat confessed to the murder on Tuesday night, with Detective Senior Sergeant Stuart Bailey telling an out-of-court-sessions hearing that Ms Nikat had made a “full confession” over the death of her daughter.

The day after charges were laid, Ms Nikat did not appear in the Melbourne Magistrates Court amid concerns over her mental state.

“In most cases, there is a strong mental health issue, which is very sad but that’s the reality,” Dr Jack White, Forensic Psychologist, told news.com.au.

Defence counsel Michael McNamara confirmed that Ms Nikat was examined by a doctor and a psychiatric nurse on the morning of the hearing, and was excused from attending the court proceedings.

It is understood that medical experts were concerned about what kind of effect the court proceeding would pose on her.

“Usually the mother is experiencing severe mental health problems. In fact, I don’t know any cases that don’t have a mother with problems,’’ Dr White said.

“Sadly mothers are the ones that are more common [to killing their children]. But with fathers, it can be a revenge response.”

In 2009, Arthur Freeman threw his four-year-old daughter, Darcey, off Melbourne’s Westgate Bridge, in front of her two younger brothers and shocked witnesses.

His “inexplicable” actions were met with grief, horror and anger across the country, and in 2011 he was sentenced to 32 years prison for murder.

During a 2015 inquest in to Darcey’s death, it was revealed that doctors were warned Mr Freeman was violent, but did not report him to authorities. It was also made evident that the then 37-year-old was angry and upset about receiving reduced access to Darcey, after a long custody dispute.

“I saw [Darcey’s mother] Peta Barnes on 13 April 2007 and she disclosed problems with her angry, irrational husband who shoves and pushes her and is often angry at the kids,” one doctor’s statement said.

The morning Mr Freeman threw Darcey off the bridge, the inquest heard that he had called a friend in tears about losing a custody battle.

Senior Sergeant Damian Jackson told the inquest, in July 2015, that Mr Freeman had never provided an account of what happened that morning.

In an interview with The Age, Dr Ben Buchanan, of the Victorian Counselling and Psychological Services said that when there is violence in the home, usually towards the spouse, it can drive some fathers to kill their own children.

“The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour,’’ Dr Buchanan said

“Physical abuse towards the partner is absolutely a sign of a propensity to use physical force against the children.’’

Dr Buchanan also admitted that men who kill their children often see a part of their partner within the child.

“Our children represent our spouses, they’ve got that symbolic representation of the mother but they are more vulnerable,’’ he said.

“In the cases I’ve seen, it’s very rare for them to blame the children; the children are a proxy by which they’re getting back at the mother.’’

And while neither cases are categorised as filicide, when the parent murders a child and follows with suicide, Sam van Meurs, a psychologist at Canberra Clinical and Forensic Psychology points out, said in an interview with Kidspot that a mother who kills her children and then herself can often have a different motivation than a father in the same situation.

“For example Donna Fitchett killed her two children in 2005 and left a note to her husband that said, ‘I just couldn’t abandon our beautiful boys’,” Mr Van Meaurs said.

“In contrast, men are more likely to kill their children for revenge or to punish their partners or ex-partners.”

According to the most recent World Health Organisation statistics, there are around 31,000 homicide deaths of children under the age of 15 in the world each year.

In Australia between 2009-10 and among children aged 0-14, there were 24 deaths due to homicide and the rate of homicide was highest among infants less than one year old.

Jack Levin, an American criminologist, told USA Today that mothers who murder tend to kill their newborns on impulse. “The day a child is born is the day a child is most likely to be killed by a parent,” he said.

Dr Phillip Resnick, director of forensic psychiatry at Case Western and is a leading expert on parents who kill their children, agreed.

“Younger children are much more likely to be killed than teenagers,” Dr Resnick said.

In an interview with TIME magazine, Dr Resnick spoke of the 40 to 60 cases he had worked on in the US that involved parents who killed their children.

In the US, the figures are staggering. About 250 to 300 children are murdered by their parents each year.

While each tragedy falls under vastly different circumstances, Dr Resnick said there are usually five characteristics in which parents kill their children.

“The first is “altruistic.” The classic case is the mother who plans to take her own life and believes that the children are better off in heaven with her,” Dr Resnick said.

“Number Two is the case in which the parent is acutely psychotic. The third type is fatal battering [the child does something to anger the parent and they react]. The fourth is [to get rid of] an unwanted baby, for example an infant born out of wedlock. The final category is spousal revenge, [in which a parent kills the children to hurt the partner], typically after infidelity,” he said.

While admitting the method of preventing crimes that involve parents murdering their children is a “complicated” one, Dr Resnick said access to mental health institutes as well as awareness of depression is mandatory in understanding what drives adults to harm their offspring.

“If a woman is very depressed and she has young children and makes a suicide attempt, there is 1-in-20 chance [in America] that she will try to take the kid with her. Specific inquiries about thoughts of harm toward children should occur in any evaluation of a seriously depressed [mother],” he said.

Dr White agrees, saying Australia needs to address its mental health facilities, and increase support for unstable parents.

“In some ways our mental health system is struggling, and sadly a lot of people don’t get the treatment they require,” he said.

“In the area of mental health, and a mother is not coping, they need to be provided with more assistance.”

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The Bangkok YanheeHospital has been offering penis enlargement surgery for some time. The latest craze, however, are Botox injections into the penis. Prices are about 300 USD. Effects last half year.

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Science is slowly getting to know what erectile dysfunction actually is. It's not a lack of sexual interest, nothing wrong with penile tissue. Erections are a vascular event. And erectile dysfunction is a weakness of vasodilation in the penile blood supply. Botox injections into the penis solve the problem elegantly. Muscles exposed to Botox can't contract. That makes for easy erections, and an enlarged penis at all times.

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Science Says Women Have The Best Orgasms At This Age — & It Might Shock You

If you’re in your 20s and you’ve had great sex, we’ve got some good news...

And if you’re in your 20s and have had awful sex, well, we’ve got even better news for you too.

Apparently the best sex of your life is still yet to come.

As reported by The Independent, In a recent survey commissioned by the contraceptive app, Natural Cycles, 2,600 women of varying age groups were asked intimate questions about their sex lives. They answered questions about how much they enjoyed sex, what made them feel sexy, how great were their orgasms and so on.

The women were broken down into three subsets: younger (below 23), middle (24-35), and older (36 and over). As for the results, 80% of women 36 and up felt the most sexually attractive. In the middle group (24-35) only 40% claimed to have felt “happy with their appearance,” while 70% of the women in the first group (23 and below) felt the same way.

As for the group that reportedly scored the most favorably? Women 36 and older reportedly had the most active sex lives and the most satisfying. In this group, 86% of the women noted that they’d had great sex over the course of four weeks. The older women also scored higher numbers when it came to actually climaxing — six out of 10 women to be exact.

The numbers are staggering. However, this isn’t the first time we’ve heard about confidence being the key to having great sex. Last year, another survey pointed out a similar sentiment: As women age, confidence levels rise and a side-effect of great confidence is a quality sex life. Afterall, how on earth can anyone possibly focus on having a mind-blowing orgasm if we’re overly concerned about our flaws?

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Shockwave therapy is the new Pfizer’s Blue. It actually cures erectile dysfunction and causes . You can do your own shockwave therapy. Just dangle your dick in front of the subwoofer, and turn your ghetto blaster to full power.

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There is a new solution coming up for ugly old women. Normally they would just become man-hating feminists. But soon they can have their brains transplanted into a sex doll, and feel beautiful again.

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Fathers who kill their children

The Guardian

Sarah Heatley sits in the warm kitchen of her East Midlands home while her son, George, plays in the room next door on his computer. Her cat is curled up on the cooker and her dog is asleep at her feet. In a cabinet behind her there are numerous framed photographs: of her completing London marathons; of George, who is 11; of her parents, her twin sister and her nieces and nephews. At first glance, it could be any typically proud family. But then you remember the two people who are missing - her son, Jack, and his older sister, Nina.

'It is the only room in the house where there are no photos of them,' Sarah, a 42-year-old nurse, explains. 'Because I need one place where I can laugh, if I want to, without feeling guilty.'

It is almost 13 years since her husband, a GP, killed their children. Jack was three and Nina four. He strangled them with a pyjama cord and wrapped their bodies in duvets, before placing them in a cellar. When their mother went to identify them in the mortuary, their faces were still stained with traces of her lipstick which they'd been playing with earlier that day.

The day before he killed his children, he videotaped them, responding to his questions about whether they wanted to 'stay with daddy' and whether they agreed that 'mummy was bad'.

On police advice, Sarah never watched it, but she believes he intended to leave it for her as some sort of justification for his actions. His body was found hours later at the foot of a block of flats.

'Even now, everywhere I look, there are reminders of them,' she says. 'Earlier this week I heard a little boy saying "Mummy" and I just burst into tears. I just heard that sweet two-year-old baby voice, and I saw this angelic, totally innocent little boy and I thought it could've been Jack.'

Of all violent crimes, those where a parent takes the lives of his or her children are the most baffling. Most parents would die to protect their child. So for a mother or father to look at their son or daughter, perhaps hear their cries, and see their uncomprehending faces, and kill them, is almost too abhorrent to think about. They must have snapped, lost their mind in a moment of madness or insanity, is the most common and convenient explanation.

It isn't surprising that we tend to recoil in horror at such tragedies and seek comfort in the belief that they are isolated incidents, senseless - and, as a consequence, impossible to avert. But the truth may be slightly less palatable. Although rare, figures show that a child in the United Kingdom is far more likely to be murdered by his or her parent than by a stranger. Even more disturbing is that many experts insist that they are virtually all premeditated.

The most recent crime statistics, for 2002/03, show that 99 people under the age of 16 were murdered in England and Wales, and seven in Scotland. More than half were killed by a parent, another 10 per cent by someone else they knew, and fewer than 20 per cent by a person unknown to them. Further analysis of the figures has shown that it is more likely that your partner is going to kill your children if you leave him than that they are going to be killed by a stranger in the park. In the past week alone, there have been two cases of what American criminologists have dubbed 'the family annihilator'.

In Northampton, 33-year-old Gavin Hall, a hospital radiographer, was jailed for life for murdering his three-year-old daughter, Amelia, known as Millie. After discovering sexually explicit emails sent by his wife, Joanne, to a part-time judge whom she had met on the internet, Hall set out to destroy his family. The night before he murdered Millie, he killed their two cats. Police believe he intended to kill Millie, her one-year-old sister, Lucy, and himself that night, but received a text message from Joanne, who was working nightshift, that led him to believe the marriage might not be over.

The following night, however, after a row with his wife, he realised it was. When Millie woke up during the night, he brought her downstairs and asked her repeatedly whether she wanted to 'come with daddy'. When she said she did, he gave her sleeping tablets and anti-depressants, then covered her nose and mouth with a handkerchief soaked in chloroform, before strangling her.

During the trial, Hall had pleaded guilty to manslaughter, arguing that his wife's affair had created an abnormality in his mind. But the jury dismissed this, and agreed that it was a premeditated murder, motivated by bitterness, anger and a desire to punish his wife.

Earlier last week, Sayrah Riaz, 16, and her sisters, Sophia, 15, Alisha, 10 and Hannah, three, were killed by their father, Mohammed, after he doused the family home in Accrington, Lancashire, with accelerants, probably diesel or petrol, locked all the doors from the inside, and set it alight. Their mother, Caneze, also died. Earlier that night, the children had been dressed up for a Halloween party, while their mother had been visiting their 17-year-old son, Adam, who is in hospital receiving treatment for leukaemia.

While no one will ever really know what was going on in Mohammed's mind - although he survived the fire, he died later in hospital - it appears that he had convinced himself that his wife was on the verge of leaving him. While both were distraught about Adam's illness, Caneze had a lot of support. She was a well-known and active member of the local community, while he remained isolated. She had become friendly with a man, Jemshad Ahmed, whom she worked with, but he insisted that there was nothing other than friendship between them.

In August, John Hogan, a 32-year-old businessman from Bristol, threw his six-year-old son, Liam, to his death from a hotel balcony in Crete. Moments later, he jumped from the same fourth-floor balcony with his two-year-old daughter, Mia. Both survived with broken bones. In this case, there were also marital problems: his wife, Natasha, 34, was threatening to leave. Again, the response was to kill his children and himself. Hogan, whose two brothers had committed suicide, has since tried again to take his own life and remains in a psychiatric hospital in Athens, accused of murder and attempted murder.

While the perpetrators of murder-suicides are usually men, in 5 per cent of cases it is the mother who is responsible. On Friday, a court in Hull heard that Angela Schumann, 28, had jumped 100ft from the Humber Bridge with her two-year-old daughter, Lorraine, in her arms. Schumann had written a note on her stomach, blaming her estranged husband. Both survived, but Schumann, who had left a note saying she 'didn't have to be a prisoner ... or his slave', faces imprisonment after admitting the attempted murder of her daughter. Another case involving a mother as the perpetrator occurred in April, when 40-year-old Alison Davies jumped from the same bridge, killing herself and her 12-year-old autistic son, Ryan.

At the heart of this is a question wrapped in such complexity that it can never be satisfactorily answered. What drives an individual to carry out an act of such unspeakable brutality against his or her own children? Is it hatred or despair, revenge or a madly possessive love? And what - if anything - can be done to prevent it?

The subject has been most widely studied in America, where there are 10 murder-suicides each week. According to Professor Jack Levin, a leading expert from North-Eastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, the most significant factors are family break-up, male sexual jealousy, a need to be in control and extreme possessiveness.

'The profile of a family annihilator is a middle-aged man, a good provider who would appear to neighbours to be a dedicated husband and a devoted father,' Levin said. 'He quite often tends to be quite isolated. He is often profoundly dedicated to his family, but has few friends of his own or a support system out with the family. He will have suffered some prolonged frustration and feelings of inadequacy, but then suffers some catastrophic loss. It is usually financial or the loss of a relationship. He doesn't hate his children, but he often hates his wife and blames her for his miserable life. He feels an overwhelming sense of his own powerlessness. He wants to execute revenge and the motive is almost always to "get even".'

Research from the States shows that family annihilators rarely have a prior criminal record. However, many experts believe there is often a prior pattern of domestic abuse. A report published two years ago in Britain by Women's Aid, called Twenty-nine child homicides, found that, out of 13 families studied, domestic violence was a feature in 11. In one of the other two cases, the mother spoke of her ex-partner's obsessively controlling behaviour.

'To the outside world, these crimes seem to come out of nowhere,' continued Levin. 'The perpetrators have not previously been involved in criminal behaviour. Nor do they tend to be on drugs or drinking heavily when they commit the crime. However, if psychologists had seen them in advance, they would have spotted the warning signs. They would have noticed how the person reacted to things not going his way - the irrational rage and the blaming of others. These people often also regard their partner and children as their own possessions.'

In the majority of cases, if the perpetrator fails in his own suicide, as in the Hogan and Hall cases, they almost always plead some form of insanity.

But Levin rejected this: 'These are executions. They are never spontaneous. They are well planned and selective. They are not carried out in the heat of the moment or in a fit of rage. They are very methodical and it is often planned out for a long time. There are certain people the killer blames for his problems. If a friend came along, he wouldn't kill him or her. He kills his children to get even with his wife because he blames her and he hates her. The killer feels he has lost control. Annihilating his family is a way of regaining control. It is a methodical, selective murder by a rational, loving father. That's why it is so terrifying.'

Although these cases are more common than child murders by a stranger, they often do not receive the same media coverage. Part of the reason is that the perpetrator often takes his own life as well - meaning there is no court case. But Levin said he also felt people were reluctant to think too much about such abhorrent crimes.

'People don't want to think about it because it makes them feel very vulnerable. When most people think of crime, they typically think of something happening in the street, being mugged or robbed or attacked by a stranger. People don't want to think it is more likely to happen in their own home. It's supposed to be a safe haven, an enclave where we can feel secure.'

In the most recent high-profile cases, such as that of Gavin Hall and Mohammed Riaz, some press reports have focused extensively on the wife's behaviour as a trigger for the crime. For instance, in the former case, one headline said: 'The judge, his sordid affair and the husband driven to murder'. Another said: 'Sex obsession of devoted mother blamed for murder of innocent child'.

But the suggestion that her infidelity was largely responsible for the murder of Millie has angered those involved in investigating the crime. Superintendent John Jones, who led the inquiry, said people seemed to need to cling on to the idea that this murder would not have happened if Hall's wife had not had an affair.

'Affairs happen all the time and people don't respond by killing their children,' said Jones. 'The marriage was doomed. She could have had a fling with a judge, a dustman or left for no one, and there would have been some sort of backlash. It was in his personality. It emerged in court that he was a controlling person and was quite sulky and non-communicative if he didn't get his own way. He didn't have the wherewithal within himself to move on after the end of the marriage.'

He said the crime had affected him and his officers more than any other in his 28 years as a detective. 'Had he killed her, I think people might have been able to understand - not condone, but understand it. But for the life of me I cannot understand why he would kill an innocent child and the person most precious to him, other than to make his wife suffer and to exert the ultimate control over her for the rest of her life. I've spent a lot of time with Amelia's mum and of course she feels guilty and responsible. She shouldn't, but she does and probably will for the rest of her life.'

Dr Alex Yellowlees, consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, said there were distinct differences in the minds of men and women who harm their children. Women, he said, tended to be mentally ill, often suffering from postnatal depression. In contrast, men tended to be struggling to deal with feelings of rage, jealousy, revenge and hatred.

'Most men and woman go through life experiencing distressing circumstances such as relationship breakdowns or financial problems, and they have developed strategies to deal with them. Most people, especially women, tend to speak to their friends, perhaps go and get drunk, sometimes chop the sleeves off their partner's suits or destroy his books or favourite CDs.

'But there are people, less functional people, who have not developed those coping skills. They have very low self-esteem. They are almost always very controlling and are less able to handle rejection. They cannot talk about it - it is as if they have failed - and they simply cannot accept it. They feel utterly humiliated and respond with the ultimate act of revenge - if I can't have you, no one can. They know that she will suffer for the rest of her life if he kills the children and leaves her alive.'

As to whether such crimes can be prevented, most experts agree that it is an almost impossible task. It can take years before a woman realises that her husband regards her, and perhaps their children, as his possessions, says Levin. 'Initially, a woman can feel flattered if her partner is jealous or possessive. It can be very hard for a woman to leave a possessive husband. When she does, or even when she tries to, that is when she is at the greatest danger.'

For Sarah Heatley, though, she is in no doubt that her children's murders could have been prevented and would like to see a radical overhaul of the judicial system, particularly the family courts. She found the courage to leave her husband and did not want him to have unsupervised contact with their children. However, the family courts, who believe contact with both parents is always in the best interests of the child, granted it. It was on their first unsupervised weekend with their father that Nina and Jack ate their cornflakes and played with their mum's lipstick before their father strangled them. 'I am still furious that the legal system didn't care about the children's safety when they were alive and nor do they care about learning lessons,' she said.

As she leafs through a photo album of her two children, who would be 16 and 18 now if they had been allowed to live, she explains that she will always feel responsible for their death. 'They were three and four and looked to me to protect them. I left him to protect them and I put my faith in the legal system. But the court ordered contact. They said I was being a hysterical and over-reactive wife. He was a GP and, to the outside world, he was an upstanding member of the community - an intelligent, generous and affable, loving father. People said he was the perfect dad.'

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Native European men are stupid if they pursue sexual relationships with Western women. Go to India and Pakistan. Every native college girl dreams of a white husband.

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Feminists have been attacking politicians or opponents with buckets of excrements without any or minimal judiciary consequences. Let's turn this game around and dowse feminists with buckets of excrements. Let's see what happens.

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5 Rules to becoming 'clitrate' and giving her the best orgasm ever

It's sad but true. More than half of 18- to 35-year-old women don't orgasm during sex, and, even worse, only four percent of women say they reach orgasm when having first-time hookup sex. That's not good.

In the following excerpt from from her new book BECOMING CLITERATE: Why Orgasm Equality Matters—And How to Get It, psychology professor and human sexuality expert Dr. Laurie Mintz gives Maxim an exclusive look at her five simple-but-surefire rules for making sure your partner has mind-blowing orgasms.

Don't be afraid to take notes.

Rule #1: Forget Everything You've Learned about Thrusting Hard and Lasting Long

You don't have to look far to find the message that the size of your penis—and your ability to last long and thrust hard—are the key to a woman's pleasure. This message is inherent in jokes about penis size and images of women having fast and fabulous orgasms from thrusting alone. Well, the first thing you need to do to make sure your partner has an orgasm is to know that your penis is essential to your orgasm, but not to hers. In study after study, women say that penis size doesn't matter to their pleasure. In fact, the only women who say they care about penis size are the approximately 5% of women who orgasm from intercourse alone. Yep, that's right. The vast majority of women don't orgasm from intercourse alone. Instead, as many as 95% need clitoral stimulation, either alone or coupled with intercourse. The clit is key—which leads to rule #2.

Rule #2: Educate Yourself on Female Anatomy and Pleasure. Become Cliterate.

A recent study found that 25% of men couldn't locate the clitoris on a diagram. Don't be one of them. Learn about the clitoris and her other pleasurable "down there." Here are a few fun facts to get you started.

The clitoris is a large internal and external organ and just like your penis, it’s chock full of erectile tissue. The parts that you can see—the clitoral glans and hood—can be found above her vaginal opening where her inner lips meet. In some women, the clit is close to the vaginal opening and in others, it can be more than an inch away.

To understand her clitoral glans, imagine all of the nerve endings of your penis poured into an area the size of a pea. Wow! That's why most women find that having their glans touched is too intense. Instead, many women like to rub the hood that covers the glans, round and round, bringing pleasure to the glans beneath. Some women like to have their clitorises stimulated even less directly, such as through their panties or by the indirect stimulation that occurs when you rub or gently pull on their inner lips, which actually connect to the clit in two places. Importantly, the inner lips are made of the same tissue as the head of your penis. No wonder they love some attention!

Rule #3: Ask For Directions "Down There"

You've probably also heard jokes about men not asking for directions and as a result, getting hopelessly lost. Well, if you want to be that guy when driving someplace new, so be it. But, please, don't be that guy when you’re getting it on with a woman, be that a long-term partner or a first-time hookup partner. Instead, ask for directions. Ask her how she likes to be pleasured.

What every woman needs to orgasm is unique to her. Making things even more complicated, what one woman needs can differ from one encounter to the other. So, the key to female orgasm lies (no pun intended) in the two C's: Clitoris and Communication. In fact, pounding the point home further (this time, pun intended), in a recent survey of over 3,000 women, almost all said that good sexual communication is much more important than penis size.

So, be a good sexual communicator. Here's a starter sentence that guaranteed to get her hot: "I want to please you. Tell me what you like." Or, try putting her hand over yours and say, "Show me what you like."

Rule #4: Be Patient with Her Pussy

Earlier I told you to forget all the junk you've learned about lasting long during intercourse. But, here is when you do need to last long: when you're pleasuring her with your fingers, your mouth, or her vibrator. Speaking of vibrators, here's another scientific finding for her sexual pleasure: Women's orgasmic capacity is related to her partner's comfort with using a vibrator. So, ask if she has a favorite toy and tell her you'd love to use it to pleasure her.

Now, back to the time issue. The average guy takes anywhere from 2 to 4 minutes from when he puts his penis in a vagina until when he ejaculates. The average woman needs about 20 minutes of external, clitoral stimulation to orgasm. In fact, Ian Kerner, author of She Comes First, tells readers that if they spend twenty or more minutes on clitoral stimulation, about 92% of female partners will orgasm. As Ian says, that's "a shift of tectonic proportions" – with the orgasm rate going from two of every three women saying they don't orgasm during partner sex to nine out of ten reaching orgasm.

So, along with telling her you want to know how to please her, let her know you are willing to take your time. Say, "Take as long as you like. I'm enjoying pleasuring you." Women often worry that they take too long to orgasm and no one can orgasm while worrying. So, reassure your partner that you want to play with her pussy until she purrs with delight. Believe me, she will.

Rule #5: Pussy Play Isn't Just a Prelude

In our culture, sex follows a typical sequence, akin to a scripted play: foreplay to get her ready for intercourse, intercourse, and game over. During this sequence, the man usually orgasms during intercourse and sadly, that is when as many as 67% of women admit to faking orgasm. To make sure your partner has a real rather than a faked orgasm, you need new scripts for your sex "play"—ones in which her orgasm is a central to the climax of the play as yours.

Let's briefly go through four new plays that you can incorporate in your sex life:

In the play titled "She Comes First," you could give her oral sex until she orgasms, followed by intercourse during which you orgasm.

Likewise, here's an example of a script for the play titled "She Comes Second": pleasure her until she's ready for intercourse, making sure to actually ask if she is, because having intercourse before she’s aroused enough can cause her pain. Then, have intercourse during which you orgasm. When you're done, use her vibrator to bring her to orgasm.

Alternatively, you could try the play where "You Come Together"—but not in those fake ways where both of you orgasm from thrusting alone that we did away with in Rule #1. Instead, for example, you could wear a cock ring with a clitoral vibrator attached (google "Vibrating Cock Ring") or she could touch herself during intercourse. (No, it's not a lesser form of sex—for some women, it's the only way).

Finally, there's a play where "Only One of You Comes." Before you say this sounds strange, recall it's what is often happening in countless "illcliterate" sexual encounters where only the man comes. Instead, in this new play, you could pleasure her to orgasm and ask nothing in return, or she could do the same for you. This may not be something you choose as the main course of your sex life, but it can be loads of fun as an occasional side dish.

The bottom line is if she's going to have mind-blowing orgasms, you've got to let go of the false stories about your penis and her pleasure. You’ve got to become cliterate instead.

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Women, especially when they get older, shit and stink, and when they shit anyway, and they enslave men, and are ugly, and they fuck around when they have the opportunity. No such problems with sex dolls, and they don't shit. Let's invest in a future without women.

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The future of the world will be that it is ruled by China, and Western men will be the sex slaves of Chinese women. Because Chinese men have big brains and small penises, but Chinese women want big ones.

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