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A teenage boy has been beheaded by ISIS for listening to Western music

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5 Reasons Why Jealousy Is a Good Thing

I’ve always been a jealous person. As an entrepreneur, I think the tendency towards jealousy is just engrained in me; I always want do better and I’m constantly striving for more.

Like most parents, mine taught me that jealousy was a negative emotion, and that I should be grateful for what I have instead of focusing on what I don’t have. I grew up believing that it was important to push jealousy away and ignore it; now I believe the complete opposite.

About four months ago, there was an important event happening in London that I wanted to attend. I knew that many of the successful people in my industry were going to be speaking at it, and that it would be life-changing for me, but for some reason, I was hesitant to register.

After a few hours of avoiding my computer, I realized what was going on: I was jealous. I admitted to my husband that I was afraid I would be too envious when I got there because I wanted to be one of the ones speaking at the event — not just another member of the audience.

I laughed out loud after hearing those words come out of my mouth — realizing how ridiculous it sounded — and soon enough my jealousy subsided and I signed-up.

Ever since that experience, I’ve come to learn that all emotions serve a purpose, so by pushing them away, I’m actually missing out on the opportunity to discover more about myself and what I want from life. My emotions, including jealousy, can act as a bit of a compass or magnifying glass, and when it comes to life or career goals, jealousy can actually be useful.

Here are five reasons why jealousy is a good thing:

1. It reveals your next step.

You have to actually know what you want to get there, right? Awareness is key when you’re trying to reach your goals, and I believe jealousy is something that’s actually quite a good indicator of where you want to be in your life. It points out where you may be holding back and what your true emotion is regarding a life step or goal. Until I felt that twinge of jealousy, I was actually unaware of my desire to speak at events.

2. It helps you make connections.

When you see someone who has done what you want to do or has what you want, you should connect with her/him. In my case, at the conference, I made connections with a few of the people I truly admire in my field, and they’ve already helped me in various ways. (And who knows, maybe I’ll even be able to collaborate with them one day!)

3. It turns into curiosity.

When you feel envious of someone, turn it around and get curious. If you aren’t able to ask them how they achieved their success, at least get curious about their path and Google their story. I guarantee that by researching one person’s story, you’ll discover even more people who have gotten where you want to go and you’ll be able to get great tips for making your dreams happen.

4. It shows possibilities.

So many people don’t know what they want from life, so use jealousy to your advantage. Whenever I feel jealous of the people who are further along in my industry, I turn that around and try to remember that they are helping me see what is possible down the line — most of which I had never even thought of!

5. It leads to more gratitude.

When you’re feeling jealous, don’t push that emotion away. Instead, turn the mirror around and look at what you’ve done and be grateful for that. And if you need some help seeing the picture clearly, contact a trusted friend who can remind you of everything you’ve accomplished and give you support in the steps you want to take next.

Remember, the grass is always greener where you water it, so focus on what’s going right in your life, give it some attention, and watch it grow. And if you need some help along the way, just get in touch with me at emily@iheartmylife.com.

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Educated women are sexually less attractive, so let's stop that nonsense of sending every girl to school.

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NATO Lawmakers Warn Global Warming Will Trigger Food Shortages

Lawmakers from nations in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization are warning that global warming will lead to mass migration and conflict in the Middle East and Africa, another reason President Donald Trump should stay in the Paris climate deal.

Climate change will lead to “dire” food and water shortages in the region, according to a draft report presented Monday to the NATO Parliamentary Assembly.

Acting as the “ultimate threat multiplier” after decades of resource mismanagement in the region, extreme weather and rising seas would likely lead to volatile food prices and increased competition, according to the report by Osman Askin, a member of the Turkish Parliament.

His country is host to more than 3 million refugees and asylum seekers, according to the report, and the surge in migration in Europe in recent years was a key reason for the U.K. voting to leave the European Union. Migration was an important plank of Trump’s presidential campaign last year, and he pledged to build a wall along the 1,900-mile (3,050-kilometer) U.S.-Mexico border.

The report, to be discussed this week in the NATO Parliamentary Assembly, urges all 146 countries that have ratified the Paris Agreement to “live up to their pledges,” including providing climate finance for developing countries.

Trump, who will attend his first meeting with leaders of the Group of Seven Countries this week, has threatened to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Accord, end climate financing and is reviewing the Clean Power Plan -- a key policy for cutting pollution introduced by his predecessor Barack Obama. He’s postponed a decision and it’s now expected by the end of May.

The report adds to pressure from Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband Jared Kushner, along with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who have been urging the president to remain in the Paris deal. Several of Trump’s top advisers are pushing for an exit, including chief strategist Stephen Bannon and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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What’s The Real Story Behind Japans Used Underwear Vending Machines?

Xpat Nation

Published by Peter Van Buren February 5, 2015 9:22 am

Is Japan The Epicenter Of Odd Sexual Perversions?

Ah, Japan. Once known to Americans only for cheap transistor radios, then the amazing first-gen Walkman, and, of late, luxury Toyota’s, Japan is now the epicenter of anime and, to some people’s minds, odd sexual perversions.

Among the most persistent myths of the width and breadth of Japan’s sexual perversions is this one: visitors have claimed you could buy used schoolgirls’ panties from public vending machines, though few admit to having seen such a thing themselves. The typical story involves a friend, or the guy next to the guy in the bunk across the hall in the hostel, who had seen such a vending machine in the wild. But do they really exist?

It seems at least possible. Japanese vending machines are amazing things. Known somewhat uncreatively just as jidohanbaiki (automatic selling machines), they are in fact a wonderland of products. In addition to nearly every soft drink known on planet earth, you can also buy canned coffee, hot or cold, whole meals, crepes, fresh flowers, beer, and whiskey.

You can purchase socks and a necktie, deodorant and shaving tackle, 24/7, at a vending machine. And there a lot of chances to buy. The country has the highest ratio of vending machines to landmass in the entire world, for a total of some 5.52 million machines. Japan’s low crime rate means they are rarely vandalized.

But What About Those Used Schoolgirl Panties?

It is not a question to be dismissed lightly. Japanese men are schoolgirl crazy, some weird mix of pedophilia, youth culture and perhaps repressed desires left over from youth. Since apparently normal sex is no longer functioning well in Japan (the falling birth rate terrifies economists), most of this gets expressed through the near-infinite range of fetishes in Japan. Panties and, um, doing “stuff” with them, have a huge following.

In the 1980s, young women could make serious money selling their undies to a “men’s shop.” These were even scummier places than they sound like, often located under train tracks and in the alleys behind the back alleys. Dirty old men would roll in and make purchases. Some of the places had posted hours for the girls to sell and the men to buy so the two groups would not have to meet. Segregated shame.

The cops eventually shut all that down, finding it too gross even for Japan. Soon after, the myth that used panty selling had migrated to vending machines arose.

One intrepid journalist set out to answer the question once and for all. He reports that while you can indeed buy schoolgirl panties from a vending machine, they are not really “used.”

The journalist found that for about five U.S. dollars, you could purchase a pair of panties manufactured to appear used. While the Japanese text on the vending machine makes this clear enough, English words such as “used” are prominently featured to attract attention. Japanese customers instantly know the difference, while foreigners who can’t read the language return home with lurid but false tales.

Or are they?

While the vending machine stories fall into the dark corners of urban myth, there appears to be a thriving online trade in selling what are said to be legitimate used women’s underwear. Purported female sellers advertise exactly how long they wore an item, and often promise to include a photo of the exact item being worn.

Who can say if the goods are real or fake, but to the weird customers who buy these things, it probably doesn’t really matter.

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Restore freedom: No taxes on alcohol and nicotine. When feminism cripples male sexuality, there must be something else that feels good before we die anyway.

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Here’s What Actually Happens When You Wake Up During Surgery Let’s talk about the bizarre thing that can happen on the operating table.

BuzzFeedNews

1. It's a clinical phenomenon called anesthetic awareness.

'Anesthetic awareness, also known as intraoperative recall, occurs when a patient becomes conscious during a procedure that is performed under general anesthesia, and they can recall this episode of waking up after the surgery is over,' Dr. Daniel Cole, president-elect of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, tells BuzzFeed Life. Patients may remember the incident immediately after the surgery, or sometimes even days or weeks later. But rest assured, doctors are doing everything they can and using the best technology available to make sure this doesn't happen.

2. One to two people out of 1,000 wake up during surgery each year in the United States.

"It's not a huge number, but it's enough people that it's definitely a problem," says Cole. Plus, the true rate could be even higher. "The data is all over the place because it's mostly self-reported." "Ideally, the anesthesiologist would routinely see the patient post-operation and ask them about intraoperative awareness," he says. But this opportunity is often lost because patients are discharged or choose to go home as soon as they can after surgery. "Even if they remember three, five days later, they might feel embarrassed and don't want to make a big deal so they don't mention it to their surgeon. So there can be underreporting of awareness."

3. It happens when general anesthesia fails.

General anesthesia is supposed to do two things: keep the patient totally unconscious or 'asleep' during surgery, and with no memory of the entire procedure. If there is a decreased amount of anesthesia for some reason, the patient can start to wake up. The cocktail of medication in general anesthesia often includes an analgesic to relieve pain and a paralytic. The paralytic does exactly what it sounds like — it paralyzes the body so that it remains still. When the anesthesia does fail, the paralytics make it especially difficult for patients to indicate that they're awake.

4. And it's not the same as conscious sedation.

Conscious sedation, sometimes referred to as "twilight sleep" is when you're given a combination of a sedative and a local or regional anesthetic (which just numbs one part or section of the body) for minor surgeries, and it's not intended to knock you out completely or cause deep unconciousness. It's typically what you would get while getting your wisdom teeth out, having a minor foot surgery, or getting a colonoscopy. With conscious sedation, you may fall asleep or drift in and out of sleep, but this isn't the same as true anesthetic awareness, says Cole.

5. Contrary to popular belief, it doesn't usually happen right in the middle of surgery.

"The anesthesiologist is very aware that this can happen and never relaxes or lets down their guard at any point during the surgery, no matter how long," says Cole. "Awareness tends to occur on the margins, when the procedure is starting and you don't have the full anesthetic dose or when you're waking up from anesthesia, because it's safest to decrease the amount of anesthesia very slowly and gradually toward the end." However, this also depends on the surgery and patient... which we'll get to in a little bit.

6. Patients often report hearing sounds and voices. "The most common sensation is auditory," says Cole. Patients will report that they were aware of voices, and even conversations that went on in the operating room — which can be especially terrifying if loud tools are involved. "If you look at the effects of anesthetics on the brain, the auditory system is the last one to shut down, so it makes a lot of sense."

And opening your eyes to see the surgeons operating on you? Basically impossible. "First of all, the anesthesia puts you to sleep, so your eyelids shut naturally. Even if you regain consciousness, the anesthesia still restricts muscle movement so your eyes will stay shut," Cole explains. "But there's still 10–20% eye opening when you sleep. So during surgery, we will cover the patient's eyes or tape them shut to prevent injury and keep the eyes clean."

7. Few patients experience pressure (and rarely pain) during anesthetic awareness.

Less than a third of patients who report anesthetic awareness also report experiencing pressure or pain, says Cole. "But that's still one too many, because the patient is kind of locked in and aware of what's happening to them but unable to move, which is terrifying." Typically, sufficient analgesic (pain reliever) is given, so that even if you wake up you won't feel pain. "More often, we use an anesthetic technique which includes a morphine-type drug to reduce pain. But this is really required for when the patient wakes up and they no longer have anesthetic so they are conscious and aware of pain," Cole says.

Even if the analgesic wears off, there should be sufficient anesthesia to keep the patient unconscious and pain-free. "It's rare. You'd have to both have insufficient anesthesia and insufficient pain medicine at the same time to feel prolonged pain during awareness," Cole says.

8. Anesthetic awareness can cause anxiety and PTSD.

"The potential psychological effects of awareness range greatly," says Cole. "It can cause anxiety, flashbacks, fear, loneliness, panic attacks — PTSD is the worse. It's been reported in a small minority of patients, but it can be very severe." says Cole. If doctors hear about someone having intraoperative awareness, they will try to get the person into therapy as early as possible, before memories can be embedded in a harmful or stressful way to patients. "If you were in the hospital for a week and on day two we heard that you woke up during surgery, we'd get a therapist in the same day. We always want to mitigate so we can try to reduce the severity of symptoms," Cole says.

9. It's most often caused by an equipment malfunction.

General anesthesia can either be given intravenously (where all or most is given through an IV) or more commonly as a gas, which you breathe in through a mask. If the equipment in either of these were to malfunction, and the anesthesiologist wasn't aware of it because the signal that gas is too low doesn't work, for example, then patients would stop receiving medication and start to wake up. Again, this is terrifying but rare.

"The anesthesia equipment is like an airplane," Cole says. "The anesthesiologist will do a pre-flight check and go over all equipment to make sure it works. But sometimes, that equipment can malfunction as short as an hour later so it won't show up before taking off." Likewise, there is equipment used to monitor the patient's vitals and brain activity, which can also fail to signal to doctors that the patient is waking up.

10. Less commonly, it's the physician or anesthesiologist's fault.

"Any time humans are involved, human error is always a possibility — but it’s more common that technology fails," says Cole. "Physicians and anesthesiologists are well-trained to look out for signs of awareness during surgery, which obviously includes any movement of muscles and changes in vitals." Since paralytics are often involved, doctors also closely monitor other signs like heart rate, blood pressure, tears, or brain electrical activity for any red flags. However, sometimes patients can be on medications that suppress the body's responses and inhibit the monitoring systems from effectively picking up warning signs of light anesthesia and awareness. These incidences can make it difficult to detect awareness, so physician anesthesiologists must closely watch an array of signs.

11. It is more likely to happen during surgeries that require "light" anesthesia.

Anesthesia also comes with risk factors, and can be harmful depending on the surgery or patient's risk. "Awareness can occur when there is too light of anesthesia, which we often do deliberately for high-risk situations," says Cole. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, high-risk surgeries include heart surgery, brain surgery, and emergency surgeries in which the patient has lost a lot of blood or they can easily go into shock. Or the patient may need a lower dose of anesthesia due to risk factors such as heart problems, obesity, a genetic factor, or being on narcotics or sedatives. "For instance, anesthesia depresses the heart, so a normal dose could be life-threatening to someone with heart problems," Cole explains.

"Sometimes you have to make a trade off," says Cole. "Would you rather have a high level of anesthesia which threatens your body's life functions, or a low level which ensures safety but increases the risks of waking up during the procedure?"

12. ...But if that's the case, your doctor will talk to you about it first.

Patients often feel better knowing that the decreased amount of anesthesia is for their own safety. "We tell the patient that there's an increased chance that you may hear some voices or fuzziness, but if it gets uncomfortable we can tell and will increase the dose," says Cole. "Patients are more understanding and happy when they understand that the risk of waking up is for their own safety."

Also, you should know that if you've had a previous incidence of awareness, that puts you at higher risk for another episode. Cole explains that in this case, doctors will spend a lot of time with the patient and anesthesiologist describing exactly what to expect, so that hopefully they won’t experience it again.

13. ALL THAT BEING SAID, the chances of this happening are slim, and medical professionals are doing everything they can to ensure that this does not happen.

According to Cole, it's always helpful to spend some time pre-operatively with the surgeon and physician anesthesiologist going over the procedure and how they'll get you through it safely and comfortably.

"I do something called 'patient engagement' and 'shared decision-making' so I can make sure the patient understands literally everything. Some patients don't want to talk about awareness because it will give them more anxiety, and they just trust us," says Cole. However, even if you aren't at risk, your doctors will be happy to answer any questions you have about anesthesia before the procedure.

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The multiverse theory explains why each of us lives in an own universe in which we may as well be immortal.

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American pedophile in Albania

02/05/2012 19:40

Top Channel

Seven years after our country was shocked by a pedophile scandal at the “Femijet e Tij” Center, (His Children), in the Albanian capital, where three foreigners had abused with homeless minors, another scandal is expected to end up in court soon.

Top Channel has secured the prosecution file against the US citizen, Carl Stephan Kaminski, today 70 years old, who arrived in Albania under the name David Gerard Golderstein. He will be prosecuted in absence for pedophilia with grave consequences against three children during 2003-2006.

One of the abused children, according to the prosecution, is still being cured for serious psychiatric problems, with the diagnosis “refractory schizophrenia” and is unable to communicate.

The minor showed these problems after he was abused. The Prosecution says that Kaminski has entered Albania as a tourist and has mostly lived in Durres. During this time he has abused with children in a house that he had rented.

“He has abused with three minors when he was living in the rented house. The defendant even took naked pictures of the children, promising to delete them”, the Prosecution file says.

The pedophile was discovered recently after a notification that arrived in 2011 by the US authorities.

According to the documents that Top Channel has secured, after abusing with the children he has left during the time when another pedophilia scandal shocked the country, that of the British citizens, David Brown, Dino Kristodulu and Robin Arnold.

But Kaminski was arrested by the German Police near Rosenheim, for traveling with false documents under the name David Gerard Golsderstein, as a Belgian citizen. In this country he was sentenced with one year and four months for falsification of documents.

After finishing the sentence, the 70 year old was handed over to the US justice, where the authorities were looking for him for sexual abuses with minors. When he was 30 years old, he was also sentenced in Massachusetts for pedophilia.

The US prosecutors found pornographic videos of him with the Albanian minors, and have immediately notified the Albanian Prosecution that opened the case.

The Albanian prosecution asked the extradition of Carl Stephan Kamisnki, based on the extradition tractate of 1993.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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Woman, 36, who stinks of rotten FISH and onions is forced to work night shifts after colleagues complain

People suffering with the metabolic condition regularly produce a range of strong bodily odours including rotten fish, onion and faeces – Kelly describes her own smell as ‘fishy-oniony.’

Her smell was so potent that at one point Kelly, from Oldham, Greater Manchester, was having four showers a day – scrubbing her skin until it was red raw to rid herself of the odour.

After receiving several complaints about her smell at work over the years, the 36-year-old suffers with severe anxiety and works night shifts at her job as a radiographer to limit the amount of people she is exposed to.

At one stage, Kelly was having four showers a day, changing her uniform twice and using whole cans of deodorant to try and mask the smell – none of which worked.

Kelly said: “Besides the smell itself, there are very few other symptoms at all and of course you have the side effects of anxiety, social isolation – it’s hard.

“As far as I know, this condition affects 300 to 600 people worldwide – it’s not very well known.”

Kelly’s condition means her body is unable to break down certain compounds found in foods that contain a substance called choline.

This results in the body disposing these compounds in a person’s sweat, breath and urine instead – emitting the most pungent of smells that Kelly herself cannot detect.

She said: “Having no sense of smell, I don’t know with me what really affects it.

“There is no magic pill that you can take to make it better, I personally take a cocktail of medications.

“One of the things they [the doctors] turn around and say to you is: ‘If it smells going in, it’s going to smell going out.’

“So things like fish and seafood are major triggers.”

Kelly’s lack of smell is an unfortunate coincidence and is not part of the condition.

Despite only receiving a diagnosis two years ago, Kelly doesn’t know whether it was passed to her genetically or she developed it during her later youth.

But she began to notice something was wrong during her early school years.

Kelly said: “There was more than one occasion where I would say: ‘I’ve had fish paste sandwiches for my lunch,’ when kids would say ‘You smell like fish.’

“That was difficult to deal with as a teenager.

“I was spending a stupid amount of time in the shower just before my diagnosis. Using red hot water, scrubbing until my skin was bright red and it was just too stressful.”

Kelly’s mother, Sandra Fidoe, added: “The fact that she was bullied about it made it ten times worse for her and certainly for me. It bothered me.”

Kelly started seeing a doctor in her late teens, but nobody could diagnose her. After researching her symptoms and watching documentaries, she pushed doctors for an answer and was diagnosed with Trimethylaminuria in 2015.

Learning more about her condition led to her discovering that the copious amount of scented deodorants she was using and the relentless showering was actually making her skin react, which caused her odour to be stronger.

Now, Kelly uses Seba-Med body wash, which is PH neutral and much more sensitive for her skin.

She also takes regular medication including; daily B-2 tablets which enhances her body’s ability to metabolise the choline in her diet and Acidophilus, which is a pro-biotic that rebalances the bacteria throughout the body.

On top of that, she takes Activated Charcoal once a day after she has eaten to clean out her digestive system.

Thankfully for Kelly, she found love online 16 years ago with her now husband, Michael, who she says makes things easier for her.

Michael, 45, said: “Kelly’s smell has sometimes affected me in a negative manner but I haven’t said anything to Kelly. I’ve just kept it to myself.

“When we were living together at the start I did notice it.

“But it wasn’t straight away when we first started seeing each other – it was never a problem.

“I don’t believe she tried to hide it either.

“Kelly wasn’t that confident when we first met – and I think the best way of me helping her with the condition is to just be supportive about the condition.

“If that was me living with the condition, I think I would struggle to do as much as Kelly does.”

Kelly added: “Michael has helped me to cope by making me see the funny side of the condition.

“I am sure he won’t mind me saying this, but he produces his own smell anyway!”

Since working night shifts at The Royal Oldham Hospital, Kelly has recently been more open and honest about her condition with her closest work colleagues.

Faysal Bashir works alongside Kelly as a CT/MR radiographer.

He said: “You could trace Kelly’s smell up the corridor. It’s quite a strong, distinct smell you get from Kelly.

“When Kelly told me about her condition I didn’t take it in for some reason and so I have always called it ‘fishiyatitus.’

“I have had many complaints about Kelly’s smell to me and from a variety of staff in the department.

“It’s hard when you get these complaints as Kelly is a good friend.

“But working with Kelly for two years as my night buddy means we have a good communication where I could tell her to go and freshen up.”

KILLER disease' Asha Feroz, a diagnostic radiographer who also works with Kelly, said: “Certain people do make comments.

“It was upsetting how people were dealing with it and at that point, Kelly wasn’t herself.

“I have got used to the smell. So it doesn’t affect my work at all.”

As much as Kelly’s friends and family have helped her through the hardships she has faced in life, it was the final diagnosis she received that allowed her to start accepting the condition with a sense of closure.

And now Kelly feels confident enough to raise awareness and speak about her condition in the hope that she can destigmatise it and people can tell her what is working to calm the smell.

Kelly said: “From watching documentaries, things started to fall into place and it sounded like it could be me when someone said it’s not just a fish odour.

“And ultimately I ended up being tested and it came back positive.

“I am more chilled about it now. I can’t say that if somebody complains tomorrow, I wouldn’t still find it a little bit cutting.

“But I deal with it by educating that person now.”

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Erectile dysfunction is mostly a vascular disease. Shockwave therapy, as commonly applied by Thai urologists, causes total neovascularization of the vital organ. The result: super erections, even at age 75.

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Secret Service officer caught in online pedophile sting gets 20 years, lifetime supervision

Federal times

Following the high-profile case of Anthony Weiner, the U.S. Attorneys' Offices have successfully prosecuted another case under the Project Safe Childhood initiative.

A former Secret Service officer has been sentenced to 20 years in prison, followed by a lifetime of supervised release, for conducting sexual conversations with a minor and attempting the exchange of explicit images.

Lee Robert Moore, 38, of Church Hill, Md., pleaded guilty March 1, 2017, after Delaware State Police with the Delaware Child Predator Task Force had sexual chats online with Moore, at times when he was a work, and were requested to send him explicit photos while posing as a 14-year-old girl.

As part of the investigation, law enforcement found Moore maintained social media profiles for similar behavior, including the sending of sexual images, with a 14-year-old girl in Texas and another 17-year-old girl in Missouri.

Moore was assigned to the White House by the Secret Service at the time of his 2015 arrest, and was terminated from his position as he was held in custody since that time.

Project Safe Childhood was launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to use federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals exploiting children via the Internet, as well as identify and rescue victims.

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Channeling tens of millions of refugees to Europe can kill feminism and Europe. It can do so reliably in the span of two decades. And to aide it is low risk political activism for people with a lot of money. Suited for Qatari and Russian billionaires. Just finance humanitarian efforts, such as rescue vessels on the Mediterranean, or life vests for those who board in Libya.

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